Feature in the 2020 Program – Become a Presenter

Stand alongside fellow mental, and behavioural health experts and share your insight, research, experience and developments.

This is your opportunity to spread the word, advance your career and provide industry colleagues with knowledge that can improve the lives of clients, co-workers and the wider community.

All selected presenters will be offered an exclusive speakers registration rate.

#1: Choose Your Topic

Make your selection from one of the above streams – and be sure to specify what style of presentation you’re interested in.

Don’t like what you see? We’d still love to hear from you. Submit your proposal under ‘other’ – you could have the great insight we’re looking for.

#2: Gather Your Information

Make sure you have a presentation title, a 300-word presentation overview, a 100-word biography and 3 key learnings of your presentation.

#3: Submit Via Our Portal

We’re ready for your submission!

TOPICS

Community Trauma

  • Responding to natural disasters and violent community events
  • Improving the mental health of first responders
  • Treating PTSD

Family Abuse

  • Reducing family and sexual violence
  • Elder and financial abuse
  • Improved protection for children and victims

Mental Health and Addiction

  • Alcohol and other drugs
  • Minimising gambling addiction
  • Gaming disorders and social media overuse
  • Addiction resources and case studies

Maori and Pacific Islander Health and Wellbeing

  • Impact of cultural alienation and generational deprivation
  • Implementation of Maori and Pacific awareness in clinical application – training
  • Adopting ‘Pacific ways’

Mental Health and Wellbeing for Refugee and Migrant Peoples

  • Cultural sensitivity and understanding: factors that may delay or prevent seeking help
  • Accessibility of resources for marginalised communities
  • Implementation of refugee and migrant awareness in clinical application - training

Social and Economic Determinants that Influence Mental Health Outcomes

  • Reducing risk of those mental disorders that are associated with social inequalities

Rural and Remote Communities

  • A new approach to rural mental health
  • Tools for dealing with mental illness
  • De-stigmatising mental health

Child, Adolescent & Youth Mental Health

  • Triggers of behavioural stress
  • Bullying and misuse of the internet and social media
  • Supporting trans and gender diverse children

Suicide and Self-Harm Prevention

  • Early intervention
  • Prevention

Workplace Wellbeing

  • Environmental and workplace design
  • Fairness and leadership
  • Legal and insurance
  • Social determinants and culture
  • Technology and the workplace
  • Wellness in the workplace

Digital Health

  • Digital health initiatives
  • Digital health stories

Policy and Advocacy

  • He Ara Oranga: Report of the Government Inquiry into Mental Health and Addiction
  • Best application of funding and advocacy

OTHER | OPEN TOPIC

  • Other topics relevant to Mental Health

PRESENTATION TYPES

ORAL 30 minute sessions

20 Minute Oral Presentation with 10 Minutes for Questions

Presentation Tips

Practice your time – remember when you are overtime you are impacting further presentations during the session

Keep to your topic/project and focus on your 3 key learning outcomes

Structure the talk – e.g. include background, research question, methods, results, discussion/conclusions and limitations/future research slides

Think about your audience – they will not be experts in your favourite multivariable methods, but at the same time they will not be ignorant about common basic issues

Respond to questions thoughtfully rather than defensively or dismissively

Table Top

Interactive Sessions

Table tops act as a pathway for networking and sharing of information directly with delegates in an interactive setting. Table Tops involve multiple presenters, with each presenter at a round table of up-to 6 participants.

How it works

The room will hold up to 6 tables each with a table number allocated. Each table will have seats for up to 6 delegates and 1 speaker. Each speaker will sit at a seat marked with a ‘reserved for table top speaker’ sign. There will be a maximum of 6 presenters in each session. The initial table you sit at is based on the number allocated by your name in the Conference Program. Each presentation has been allocated 15 minutes. It is up to you how you wish to divide your 15 minutes between presenting, adaptation or discussion.

Once your 15 minutes is up, music will start playing and you will need to move to the next table number then repeat your presentation. If you are located on Table 6 you move to Table 1 and continue. Presenters will present approximately 6 times during a session.

Panel Sessions

3+ Industry Professionals

The time that has been allocated to your panel presentation will be a total of 1 hour and 30 minutes. You need to allow 1 hour for your presentation and 30 minutes for questions and answers between panel members and delegates. This can be broken down into a brief introduction of each panel member followed by questions from the moderator or individual presentations that link together with questions and answers.

Workshop Presentations

90 minutes of active learning

The time that has been allocated to your panel presentation will be a total of 1 hour and 30 minutes. You need to allow 1 hour for your presentation and 30 minutes for questions and answers between panel members and delegates. This can be broken down into a brief introduction of each panel member followed by questions from the moderator or individual presentations that link together with questions and answers.

Poster Presentations

All posters should be a visual presentation of your submitted abstract.

Posters should meet the following criteria:

The poster must be PORTRAIT and must not exceed A0 size (preferred size)— 841 x 1189 mm (width x height)

All posters must have a title and include the author(s) name

It is suggested that heading font sizes does not exceed 60 point. General content font should be a maximum of 32 point
Headings such as “Introduction”, “Methods”, “Results” and “Conclusions” are useful
The use of Upper and lower case for general content, as the use of all-capital text is difficult to read. Avoid using a mixture of type/font styles
The text should be brief throughout. Any description of methods should be simple and concise
The message that your poster contains should be clear and understandable without the requirement of oral explanation.

Abstract: The abstract should be short and concise, stating: the problem, hypothesis or objective and its relevance; what was done to solve the problem, test the hypothesis or meet the objective; and what happened.

Introduction: Briefly justify your study. Highlight the objective, purpose or hypothesis using a separate subsection or by a bullet point or bold print.

Methods: Keep this section brief, unless your purpose is to present a new method. Wherever possible use pictures, flowcharts, or bullet points to summarise methods. In most cases great detail is not required. Intricacies can be saved for verbal discussion with interested parties.

Results: This is the most important section of the poster. Limit text, but use clear tables, graphs or other illustrations for the data. Present enough relevant data to make your points. Extraneous information, no matter how interesting, will detract from your main point. Save such material for another presentation.

Conclusions: Keep them brief and in list form. Do not restate results. Clearly, summarize the key significant points or contributions of your study. Place your results in the context of current theory.

IMPORTANT DATES

Abstracts close

Friday 15 November

Program available

Tuesday 10 December

Early bird closing

14th February 2020

Conference dates

16 – 17 March 2020